It’s going to be an exciting Autumn Winter season from Stylecraft

It may seem odd to be talking about yarns for the colder months when we are in the middle of summer, but yarn companies traditionally start to launch their new yarns towards the end of June, so that you can complete your pattern before the weather turns chilly

We have some exciting new yarns that will be in your yarn shop very soon, so we thought we would showcase some of them for you.

We are introducing a new member to the Life family, called Life Changes. Available in 8 rich, semi-solid shades, Life Changes is supported by 7 pattern leaflets including 3 for ladies, 3 for girls and 1 featuring accessories. The designs are simple yet stylish, with subtle dashes of texture to really bring out the beauty of this yarn. 

Life DK is a very popular yarn across a whole range of projects from garments to accessories and designs for the home. This season there are 5 new, deeply rich shades to enhance the existing palette, with 7 pattern leaflets for ladies and girls.  These classic designs are embellished with tipping and stripes, as well as textures and cables.  Perfect for any winter wardrobe.

What could be nicer than chunky cables for the chilly months ahead? We are launching 3 subtle new shades in Special Aran with Wool featured in 4 new designs, which showcase garments and accessories. So, whether you are planning long walks in the country or want an on-trend garment for everyday wear, Stylecraft has an option for you. These patterns for 400g balls are cleverly designed with matching accessories to use up leftover yarn.

Finally, we have an exciting exclusive for you. The delightful Sandra Paul, one of the Stylecraft Blogstars, who writes under the name Cherry Heart, has created a blanket and cushion combo using one of our most successful semi-solid yarns – Batik.  The crochet pattern features the kind of colours that Sandra is so fond of, put together in her own unique way.

Don’t forget to keep an eye on our social media for more launches in the coming weeks.

Teaching and Sharing

Passing on skills is a vital part of the history of knitting and crochet. Without parents, grandparents and other family members passing on their skills, our crafts would quite simply have died out.

Today we pass on our skills in so many different ways, not just to our kids, but to work colleagues, friends and even the public at events throughout the country.

Teaching others can bring such a huge sense of satisfaction. To see someone who has struggled with a knit stitch complete a whole row makes us want to whoop. Being sent a picture of a crocheted blanket from someone who may have only just taken up the craft is a very proud moment for any teacher.

So, we turned to our Stylecraft friends to ask them about their experience of passing on skills and wanted to share their experiences with you.

“I taught my friend to crochet and now we have a girlie crochet night each week, and then we joined a group of knitters and crocheters and we are making a huge Poppy display for this year’s centenary of the end of the First World War, and we both then taught some ladies to crochet in the group and now crochet is part of their lives.”

“I run three crochet, knitting and yarn craft social groups in three towns close to where I live with help from my other half and my best friend. We offer a supportive, friendly environment and have met some wonderful people over the last 12 months. Part of what we do is encourage people to share their knowledge and skills.”

“I started to bring my projects (either knitting or crocheting) to work to make them at lunchtime. Few colleagues joined me – they were intimidated to bring theirs to work… I am a self-taught crafter and I don’t hold back to try a pattern or different techniques. I’m confident I’ll be able to complete the project.
Given that, I became the “go-to” person among our group (of 10 co-workers) for any project. I help them to read pattern and diagrams and to find where they missed and how to correct.”

“I spread the word and share the links to websites or FB groups to the crafters’ community. This is my way of giving back – my grandmother initiated me to crochet when I was seven, it’s a healthy way to get your stress level down.”

“I started my friend off on crochet. She was a better student than I am teacher. She now knits as well as crochets but I just can’t get the hang of knitting. I’m hoping to be able to help a couple of other people pick up crochet too after they’ve shown an interest, just hard to find the time we’re all free to do so.”

“I taught all four of my children to knit, crochet and sew. One is now a tailor and still knits and crochets, one crochets, one knits and my son didn’t take to either. I now teach crochet twice a week and am on the verge of going self-employed to teach crochet, knitting, sewing and multiple other crafts. I find my classes become like a mental health group too. Many of my students live alone or have stressful jobs so treasure their two-hour class to help them touch base and unwind and socialise.

“I belong to a mixed craft group. We meet every Wednesday and swap skills by running workshops to show fellow members our favourite techniques. I’ve taught fair isle knitting, crochet baskets, advanced crochet squares, to name but a few ……. and of course, learned loads of new skills too.”
Passing on skills is a vital part of the history of knitting and crochet. Without parents, grandparents and other family members passing on their skills, our crafts would quite simply have died out.

Today we pass on our skills in so many different ways, not just to our kids, but to work colleagues, friends and even the public at events throughout the country.

Teaching others can bring such a huge sense of satisfaction. To see someone who has struggled with a knit stitch complete a whole row makes us want to whoop. Being sent a picture of a crocheted blanket from someone who may have only just taken up the craft is a very proud moment for any teacher.

So, we turned to our Stylecraft friends to ask them about their experience of passing on skills and wanted to share their experiences with you.

“I taught my friend to crochet and now we have a girlie crochet night each week, and then we joined a group of knitters and crocheters and we are making a huge Poppy display for this year’s centenary of the end of the First World War, and we both then taught some ladies to crochet in the group and now crochet is part of their lives.”
“I run three crochet, knitting and yarn craft social groups in three towns close to where I live with help from my other half and my best friend. We offer a supportive, friendly environment and have met some wonderful people over the last 12 months. Part of what we do is encourage people to share their knowledge and skills.”

“I started to bring my projects (either knitting or crocheting) to work to make them at lunchtime. Few colleagues joined me – they were intimidated to bring theirs to work… I am a self-taught crafter and I don’t hold back to try a pattern or different techniques. I’m confident I’ll be able to complete the project.
Given that, I became the “go-to” person among our group (of 10 co-workers) for any project. I help them to read pattern and diagrams and to find where they missed and how to correct.”

“I spread the word and share the links to websites or FB groups to the crafters’ community. This is my way of giving back – my grandmother initiated me to crochet when I was seven, it’s a healthy way to get your stress level down.”

“I started my friend off on crochet. She was a better student than I am teacher. She now knits as well as crochets but I just can’t get the hang of knitting. I’m hoping to be able to help a couple of other people pick up crochet too after they’ve shown an interest, just hard to find the time we’re all free to do so.”

“I taught all four of my children to knit, crochet and sew. One is now a tailor and still knits and crochets, one crochets, one knits and my son didn’t take to either. I now teach crochet twice a week and am on the verge of going self-employed to teach crochet, knitting, sewing and multiple other crafts. I find my classes become like a mental health group too. Many of my students live alone or have stressful jobs so treasure their two-hour class to help them touch base and unwind and socialise.

“I belong to a mixed craft group. We meet every Wednesday and swap skills by running workshops to show fellow members our favourite techniques. I’ve taught fair isle knitting, crochet baskets, advanced crochet squares, to name but a few ……. and of course, learned loads of new skills too.”

“My daughter has problems with depression and I taught her to knit and crochet. She’s still learning but loves it and says it does help.”

“I have taught people at work to crochet and knit so they can make squares. We have a bit of a tradition for making patchwork baby blankets for expecting colleagues and staff always like to learn so they can join in.”

“I’m part of a prayer shawl ministry. We make shawls and prayer cloths for people going through a difficult time, and we welcome and help new knitters and crocheters.”

“I teach people both knitting and crochet at my volunteer workplace, a wellbeing/substance abuse counselling centre.”

“My daughter has problems with depression and I taught her to knit and crochet. She’s still learning but loves it and says it does help.”

“I have taught people at work to crochet and knit so they can make squares. We have a bit of a tradition for making patchwork baby blankets for expecting colleagues and staff always like to learn so they can join in.”

“I’m part of a prayer shawl ministry. We make shawls and prayer cloths for people going through a difficult time, and we welcome and help new knitters and crocheters.”

“I teach people both knitting and crochet at my volunteer workplace, a wellbeing/substance abuse counselling centre.”